Our Estate Planning Blog

What Does Medicare Cover?

what does medicare cover
Medicare kicks in at 65 to help cover healthcare costs as a senior. However, it's not nearly as comprehensive as many people think.

Actually, far from covering all your healthcare needs, Medicare may leave you with thousands of dollars in expenses for which you’ll be responsible. So what does Medicare cover?

The recent article in The Mooresville Tribune entitled “3 Reasons Medicare Coverage Isn’t as Comprehensive as You Think” provides three reasons why:

  1. Medicare has expensive deductibles and coinsurance. There are different parts to Medicare. Part A covers hospital care. Part B pays for outpatient care. Each one has deductibles and some coinsurance expenses. Let’s look at these examples:
  • Medicare Part A has a $1,408 deductible per benefit period this year. If you are in the hospital more than 60 days during a benefit period, you’ll owe coinsurance costs starting at $352 per day, based on how long you remain in care.
  • Part B has a $198 deductible in 2020, and you’ll pay coinsurance costs of 20% of the Medicare-approved amount for medical services after you meet the deductible. You’ll also owe monthly premiums.
  • Part C (Medicare Advantage) takes the place of traditional Medicare (Parts A and B) with private insurance. Coinsurance, copay and premium costs vary by plan.
  • Part D (prescription drug coverage) has several plans with varying premiums and coverage rules.

As a result, with only Parts A and B, you could wind up paying thousands of dollars out of pocket. That’s especially true, if you’re hospitalized for a long time during the year or if you need extensive outpatient care.

  1. Coverage exclusions. In addition, there are some items of care that Medicare doesn’t cover at all. For example, Medicare doesn’t cover routine dental care, eye exams, contacts, hearing aids or glasses.
  2. Medicare doesn’t cover long-term care in most circumstances. A major Medicare exclusion is long-term care insurance. Medicare covers care in a skilled nursing facility under a few circumstances, such as after a long hospital stay when you need assistance from a medical professional to recover. However, the program doesn’t pay for “custodial care,” either at home or in a nursing home. Thus, if you require someone to help you with routine aspects of daily living, like getting dressed, eating, or using the bathroom, you’ll have out-of-pocket costs.

It’s important to know that long-term care can be very costly. The median monthly costs of home health aides are roughly $4,300, and a semi-private room in a nursing home costs about $7,500 in 2019, according to Genworth. Since Medicare won’t pay for any of this in most circumstances, you’ll need another way to pay for it.

Don’t assume that Medicare will cover all your needs as a retiree. So, prior to retirement, examine what Medicare will actually cover. That will help you determine the amount you’ll need to save for healthcare costs. You can also consider Medigap or Medicare Advantage Plans or look into long-term care insurance.  Consider it as part of you estate planning when speaking with a Naperville estate planning lawyer about other things such as minimizing family fights.

Reference: Mooresville Tribune (Aug. 10, 2020) “3 Reasons Medicare Coverage Isn’t as Comprehensive as You Think”

 

Please Share!

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on google
Google+
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Subscribe!